Archives for posts with tag: Africa

We regret to make our first post of the year on a dark note, but hey this is life. Sometimes we really have no choice but to go with its flow.

South African Jazz Maestro Hugh Masekela has passed away peacefully at the beautiful age of 78.

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This one really hurts.

If you never knew about the artist until now, you’ll be doing yourself a solid one by clicking on the youtube video below and further looking him up.

Hugh, we are thankful for your music, activism, pan-Africanism and will also miss your humor in this strange world.

Journey well.

 

 

Photos by The Guardian and Getty Images.
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The year 2017 like its predecessors was full of twists and turns and laughs and tears but WE ARE HERE STILL, and that’s what matters most.

AFRIKAJUMP is thankful for your support, and like The Roots crew, we plan to proceed and continue…to rock our..blog mic. Hehehehe.

Many blessings in the coming year people. Here’s our 2017 in a summary. Join us for a bigger and better experience in 2018. Ashe for us!

Brazilian musician Andre Sampaio  released his latest Album, Alagbe today, November 3rd 2017. Great things happen in November!

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The 13 track work is Andre’s second studio album and a testament of his creativity and in conjunction with his band Os Afromandinga. The versatility in culture  and music styles with deep homage to Africa and African spirituality embedded in the album is inspirational and uplifting. Alagbe is a sweet Africa and South America union and has all the ingredients of a modern Afro-Rock classic.

 Alagbe means the guardian of Candomblé‘s sacred music.  Candomblé is a an African spiritual belief system brought from Africa to Brazil by enslaved people from West Africa.

The production of Alagbe has heavyweights like Cris Scabello of Bixiga 70, Victor Rice and more, and featured musicians like Mauricio Fleury, Roberto Barreto from Baiana System, Poet Nelson Maca, Sekou Diarra from Burkina Faso, Lenna Bahule (Mozambique) and Nigerian singer Okwei Odili.

ANDRÉ 1Album Cover Art and visual identity is by Ricardo Magrão.

Alagbe is available on digital platforms, like here:

https://SMB.lnk.to/AlagbeAlbum

It is distributed by Planet Music Brazil / Sony Music Brasil.

 

Funk, Jazz, Afrobeat and Highlife musician and composer Segun Bucknor passed away yesterday, August 11. He was 71.

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The gifted instrumentalist and journalist added his quota to Nigeria’s bustling and rising music scene of the 60’s and 70’s with musical masterpieces like Love and affection, Dye Dye, You’re killing me, Adebo, Ayinde Ogo, Smoke and many other carefully crafted tunes.

He will be terribly missed. In the link below he plays his wicked funky tune- Love and affection. Sleep well sir.

The post is by Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili in collaboration with Goethe Institute Lagos and Insibidi Institute in honor of World Music Day 2017.

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Read here-

http://nsibidiinstitute.org/sound-is-powerful-and-unending/

PHOTO BY SILVIA LEMIE

 

 

Happy World Dance Day 2017!

In celebration of this day our guest is Nigeria’s Qudus Onikeku, one of Africa’s finest dancer and choreographer. Qudus is the founder of Qdance Academy in Lagos, and did us proud at this year’s  Biennale du Val de Marne in March.

Here’s his message on this day.

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Happy World Dance Day!

In the beginning wasn’t the word, in the beginning was MOVEMENT. The word was initially a thought in the mind of God, a moment within a sacred Dance in God’s mind, a moment of desire to create, to assemble and to recreate. It is within this “desire,” its metamorphoses, its sight, hearing, sense of smell, taste, touch – in short, its expressive power– that we mortals DANCE and CREATE.

In our beginning was MOVEMENT. A gush of sperm, a speed towards the ovum, and a continuous evolution which began, till it became blood, till it became a piece of meat, till it became a toad like creature, till it became a fetus, till it became a baby, till it became a child, till it became an adolescent and naive, till it became adult and restless, till it became old and experienced, till it became weary and frail, till it loses life, till it became dead, till it became corpse and degenerated, till it became worms, till it became insects and the MOVEMENT never cease to be.

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To connect with Qudus, peep his website

http://www.qudusonikeku.com/

Check out this excerpt of his piece “My exile is in my head”

Inspiring writer Bura Bari Nwilo is our guest today and it is a real pleasure.

Like the late African hero Ken Saro Wiwa, he hails from Ogoni land- a paradise in Nigeria turned to a bed of conflict centered on oil, and as you read on; Bura reveals to us from his Port-harcourt base what this means to him.

His contagious humor and satiric sense has earned him even more fans on social media, and frankly speaking he brings joy to many with his wise cracks, much needed in beautiful and chaotic Nigeria.

Here’s the cover of his new book, A Tiny Place Called Happiness.

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Now we invade the man in question, a little bit.

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AFRIKAJUMP- Welcome Bura and thank you for talking with us. I’m curious to know which African writers have influenced you the most, and how?

BURA- In terms of simple storytelling, Achebe would take the honour and of course it is basically by reading his works. In terms of experimenting and taking unconventional approaches, Dambudzo (Dambudzo Marechera) would be the man. I have read the House of Hunger and some of his works published posthumously. I love Ms Adichie too. She works magic with intricate sentences and details.

AFRIKAJUMP- Like the great late Ken Saro-Wiwa, you are from Ogoni land. How does the past and present history of your ancestral home affect you as a person and as a writer?

BURA- Currently, violence among the young people give me sleepless nights and sometimes I want to create fiction but the thought of my mother in the village give me worries. The despoliation of the land and our insistence on government to take responsibilities are factors that spur any creative person.

AFRIKAJUMP- And as a writer?

BURA- I always feel that writers have a way of representing their cultures in their works. Mine is under-represented. See what Junot Diaz does with Dominican Republic. The fine memories I have of Ogoni and the people, of love and late night play in the sand, if I don’t capture them fictionally, I doubt if anyone would.

Ken Saro-Wiwa is a pathfinder when it comes to stories from this part of the world and I appreciate his styles and courage to tell it.

AFRIKAJUMP- If you were appointed by government as part of a team to support Literary Arts in Nigeria what top 3 remedies would you prescribe?

BURA BARI- We would give adequate support to indigenous publishing houses and create reading centres across the country. This would help to reunite book readers again. When you visit some of the libraries, either the rooms meant for literary discussions have been turned into shops or made into stores. We will bring it back. We’d set up reading contests so that young people would know that reading is cool too.

AFRIKAJUMP- You have a funny bone. Your book; Diary of a bloody retard is proof; and there’s that letter you wrote to Nigerian pop star Dbanj some years ago. Of course we cannot exclude your social media updates. Many Nigerians use humor as a survival mechanism. Is this your case too? Are you going to take your comic to perhaps the movies, and more?

BURA- Yeah. It is in my book on relationship – Diary of a Stupid Boyfriend and of course the recent book of short stories – A Tiny Place Called Happiness. Humor is one way to survive around here. It could be too dark and to see the lighter side of the things around here keeps life in us.

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 AFRIKAJUMP- Any past, present or future project(s) you want us to know about?

BURA- I am still promoting A Tiny Place Called Happiness. I may be working on a book of stories for young children. I have been researching that for a while. It is still developing. And yes, I am looking at going back to school, get a degree in African Studies and write some more.

AFRIKAJUMP- Can you try to describe your city in one word? Okay two words max.

BURA- Chaotically beautiful.

 

CONNECT MORE WITH HIM HERE

www.themetroreview.com

rottenbiro.blogspot.com