Archives for posts with tag: AfroBrazilian

The 33rd Bienal of São Paulo, Brazil officially opened to the public on September 7th, 2018 and AFRIKAJUMP was right in the thick of Ibirapuera Park- home to the massive Bienal building, for all the action- okay, most of it.

Ibirapuera park is famed for being the most visited park in South America.

ibi41214ephoto credit- trekearth.com

TIPS- #Surely bring your cameras to capture the greenery, art and of course, birds.

#Wear running shoes.

#Try the restaurants in the park.

For an entire week Afrikajump had a blast in Sampa (nickname for SP) getting up-close and sometimes personal with artists and their work, and once we did party. Responsibly.

According to its organizers, the 32nd edition of the global event which exhibits some of the most interesting artworks from around the world- over 600 of them this year, traveled to 13 venues (2 of them abroad), reaching at least 650,000 people.

This year, the foundation hand-selected Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro to curate, and then seven other artists were invited to do likewise, namely Mamma Andersson, Antonio Ballester Moreno, Sofia Borges, Waltercio Caldas, Alejandro Cesarco, Claudia Fontes, and Wura-Natasha Ogunji.

Ogunji, a visual artist of Nigerian and American heritage and her group of selected artists and collaborators brought rays of light, diversity and womanity to the event. Her curated work entitled Sempre, nunca [Always, never], involves selected artists like Lhola Amira- South Africa,  Mame-Diarra Niang- Ivory Coast/Senegal,  Nicole Vlado- US/Puerto Rico, Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze- Nigeria, and Youmna Chlala- Lebanon/US.

According to Wura,“Their creative investigations range from the intimate (body, memory, gesture) to the epic (history, country, cosmos),”

She added that the six artists are presenting new artworks that explore space and place in relation to the body, to history and to architecture, and that their work was developed in a dialogue among artists, their individual projects and practices inter-cross ideas and questions about courage, freedom and experimentation, key aspects of the artistic process.

WhatsApp Image 2018-09-21 at 00.37.33‘The sea and it’s raining. I missed you so much’ 2018. By Wura Ogunji on display at the Bienal.
WhatsApp Image 2018-09-21 at 00.36.19WhatsApp Image 2018-09-21 at 00.36.17Nicole Vlado’s ‘Here’ (I gaze at stars to heal wounds) 2018. On display at the Bienal.

Wura besides expressing through drawings, videos and public performances often explores the presence of women in public spaces in collaboration with other women, and this was seen also on Sunday September 9th , where dozens of Brazilian and African women donned black attires and eventually transformed into gorgeous dresses made of richly colored African prints in a performance ‘Dias de ser livre’ or in English, ‘Days of being free’. It was presented by 20 women and with the participation of the public.

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We appreciated most of the art and expressions at the event, and are happy to say our top pick for 2018’s Bienal is undoubtedly Wura Ogunji with her African queens.

Their works network and connect to create a melting point of healing, reflection, serenity and strong hope. Days of being free was a hit, drawing in the public to that all familiar situation of struggles which give way to victories, ease and peace.

And to further cream our desserts, check out the women’s musical compilation playlist for their project. It made us fiercer fans.

Listen here

http://www.33.bienal.org.br/pt/playlist-detalhe/5303

Artworks can now be seen at the Bienal building in Ibirapuera park until early December, consult  with Bienal site to know more.

http://33.bienal.org.br/en/

Photos from Days of being free. Credits/ Fabiola Antunes, Wura Ogunji, Ana Lu Sanches.
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The venue was the historical Pelourinho in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil on Sunday 12th of August. It was the close of a book festival and the afternoon till late evening was alive with music, color and culture, right in front of the Jorge Amado foundation.

The event featured Salvador’s Afrosymphonic Orchestra, Mario Uolla, Gabriel Batatinha, Doudou Rose from Senegal, Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili, Monica Millet, Bira Reis, and many more cool cats.

In this clip, legendary Baiana Percussionist Monica Millet and her all female group- Mestras do Saberes play Samba Reggae in the company of Baiano Percussionist- Anderson Souza, /RIGHT/ whose father was one of the founders of OLODUM, the group which in addition to many feats choreographed Michael Jackson’s ‘They don’t really care about us’, another legend- Bira Reis plays the Sax, and Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili sings in Yoruba.

Enjoy, and PEACEEEE.

Sunday 29th of January 2017 ushered in the Senhor do Bomfim celebrations in Muritiba Bahia. It was a colorful event filled with dancing, costumes and yes; horses.

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AFRIKAJUMP captured some moments from the historical event that attracted people from many parts of the state and beyond; and as usual, African-Brazilians displayed their heritage proudly…

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More photos below:

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Reggae’s most prominent exponent Bob Marley says in one of his songs “If you know your history, then you will know where you are coming from”. While it is favorable to some despicable elements for some histories to be erased or distorted to promote lies/lines that entrap many and enrich them and a select few, there are many people who refuse to be oblivious to their past, however unfortunate it may have been. Some of these people are Brazilians in South America who share African heritage, the Afro Brazilians.

In this second nation on earth with the largest concentration of Africans besides Nigeria, Afro Brazilians in states like Bahia, Recife, Rio De Janeiro, and Goiania insist on practicing their ancestral spiritual beliefs, especially through Candomble, which adores African gods. The religion is mostly patterned in Nigeria’s Yoruba traditional belief systems.

Every February in Salvador, Bahia devotees of Yemoja- goddess of the sea gather to sing, dance, offer sacrifices laced with perfume, talc, flowers and jewelry in hopes of

blessings from this maternal energy.

After the early morning rituals, there are musical concerts and street exhibitions and it is a beautiful sight that we are looking forward to in a few weeks, like we did in 2016.