Archives for posts with tag: Brazil

The year 2017 like its predecessors was full of twists and turns and laughs and tears but WE ARE HERE STILL, and that’s what matters most.

AFRIKAJUMP is thankful for your support, and like The Roots crew, we plan to proceed and continue…to rock mic. Hehehehe.

Many blessings in the coming year people. Here’s our 2017 in a summary. Join us for a bigger and better experience in 2018. Ashe for us!


Brazilian musician Andre Sampaio  released his latest Album, Alagbe today, November 3rd 2017. Great things happen in November!


The 13 track work is Andre’s second studio album and a testament of his creativity and in conjunction with his band Os Afromandinga. The versatility in culture  and music styles with deep homage to Africa and African spirituality embedded in the album is inspirational and uplifting. Alagbe is a sweet Africa and South America union and has all the ingredients of a modern Afro-Rock classic.

 Alagbe means the guardian of Candomblé‘s sacred music.  Candomblé is a an African spiritual belief system brought from Africa to Brazil by enslaved people from West Africa.

The production of Alagbe has heavyweights like Cris Scabello of Bixiga 70, Victor Rice and more, and featured musicians like Mauricio Fleury, Roberto Barreto from Baiana System, Poet Nelson Maca, Sekou Diarra from Burkina Faso, Lenna Bahule (Mozambique) and Nigerian singer Okwei Odili.

ANDRÉ 1Album Cover Art and visual identity is by Ricardo Magrão.

Alagbe is available on digital platforms, like here:

It is distributed by Planet Music Brazil / Sony Music Brasil.


The post is by Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili in collaboration with Goethe Institute Lagos and Insibidi Institute in honor of World Music Day 2017.


Read here-





AFRIKAJUMP took a trip on February 17 to a spiritual place, Terreiro do Capivari. We found it magical too.


This large expanse of land in Bahia Brazil is a testament to history, Africa and the inspiring resilience of Afro-Brazilians. Nature lives and thrives here as evidenced by its luscious vegetation.  Its natural ambiance is a huge part of  Terreiro do Capivari’s history. In Brazil a terreiro is where the Afro-Brazilian religion called Candomblé is practiced. This religion with roots from Nigeria and Benin Republic was spread in countries like Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, America and some other nations by Africans who were stolen through slavery.

The most striking visual here in Terreiro do Capivari has to be a proud Iroko tree dedicated to Obaluaiye-lord of the earth, and Osumare– the Rainbow god. The magnificent tree with delicious fruits dates over 200 years.


Another remarkable thing is this tree lives right in the house with the inhabitants who made an altar of it. It has being a home of refuge and prayer for so many decades.


In the story narrated by the gracious Babalorisa and Iyalorisa who received us warmly, the location was lived in by a Brazilian slave owner who as expected bought a stolen African; an ancestor of this present Babalorisa. As time went on, freedom came for the enslaved in Brazil, but Baba’s ancestor continued to live there while he weighed his options.

Then there came a major outbreak of cholera which killed many. Baba’s ancestral family was affected but they did not die because their father knew what herbs to get from the bush to tackle the disease. Eventually the disease spread to the slave owner’s family, the lady of the house panicked and asked Baba for help. Baba’s kindness and his plants saved them, and in gratitude she asked him to choose a large portion of the land for himself. He erected his altar and the rest is history.

There is a house of Baba Egun, altars of Ogun, Sango, and a sweet running stream, a sign of Osun.

There are many relics from many decades past like this box used to transport materials, drums fashioned directly from a tree, this grinding stone, which was stolen but recovered by Brazilian authorities in far away Sao Paulo! Sigh. Some people are just…No words.

Reverence to our good ancestors is a huge part of Africa’s belief systems, and in this terreiro, ancestors who set the path are fondly remembered.

Today the land is home to many medicinal plants- some rare, trees and unending music from birds.

AFRIKAJUMP is grateful to Babalorisa and Iyalorisa who welcomed us with open arms and minds.

There are plans for an exposition here in the near future. To know more, here’s their facebook



Translated into English, this Portuguese phrase means Jam at MAM. MAM is Salvador’s Museum of Modern Art in Bahia, Brazil. As the name indicates it is a center for contemporary arts, particularly visual arts but every Saturday MAM comes even more alive with hundreds of people attracted by amazing music from some of the state’s best musicians. Musicians from all parts of the world who visit Brazil often pass through to jam at MAM, with its wonderful view of the Atlantic ocean.


TIP: Forget about finding a seat if you come later than 6 PM, when the show starts. Also if you don’t want to stay on the epic queue, come early.


At Jam no MAM, popular and complicated jazz standards are improvised on by these talented musicians including Brazilian tunes. The musicians play just about anything from African music to American soul from folks like Roy Hargrove, Ray Charles and James Brown- whoever catches their fancy.

Another fun part of the event is that as a singer or musician attending the jam, you are very welcome if there’s time, to sing and play with the band. AFRIKAJUMP was there on February 11 where singers like Okwei Odili- Nigeria, Cecelia Stalin- Sweden joined with visiting instrumentalists from other parts of the world to play with Jam no MAM regulars like Ivan Huol, Matias Traut, Andre Cruz Tang, Ivan Bastos, Andre Becker, Gabi Guedes, his nephew Felipe Guedes, Bruno Aranha, Artur Carneiro and more. Joatan Nascimento, a prominent horn player in Bahia was in attendance.



For more, check out their website and facebook below. Peace.


Nigerian and South American music collective in Brazil; Okwei Odili and Aweto Band had their first outing in this year on February 3 at Tropos, Salvador. The gig which was also in tribute to Yemoja week in Bahia, attracted friends and fans of the band who were thrilled with Afrobeat, Soul and Reggae vibes enhanced by the band’s ancestries.


They perform Okwei’s composition- SUFFER in the link below

To be in the know about the band’s activities, click and LIKE their page here-






The night of February first was alive with hundreds of people in the streets of Salvador, mostly dressed in white and blue, some in gold and pink; in honor of maternal deity/energy of the Sea- Yemoja, Yemaya, Iemanja.

The very next day February second would be the climax of the yearly event, with more people; fanfare and Baianos ancestral customs of worship, culture, fashion and other expressions on full display.

Afrikajump joined many faithfuls and adventure seekers who kept vigil on the night of February first in Rio Vermelho- Salvador, and here are some shots of the event.











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