Archives for posts with tag: History

Aboh Kingdom is a vibrant city along the coast of the Niger River and home to the headquarters of Ndokwa East Local Government Area in Delta State Nigeria. It is also home to late highlife music phenomenon, Ali Chukwuma., amidst rising stars like Okwei Odili, and Uti of Big Brother Nigeria fame amongst others. YEAH!

photo by Aboh Kingdom Website

This highly cultural and musical people of Aboh are said to have migrated from Benin kingdom, during the reign of Oba Ozolua, towards the end of the 15th century.

Also famed for warriors, and natural resources, the people of Aboh and those from elsewhere congregate every March, to celebrate Ojeh festival amidst parades, boat regatta and parties in the town.

Here are some scenes from this year’s Ojeh. We hope to make a more comprehensive video of the festival next year, as this one barely does justice to this amazing beauty of/in Nigeria, Africa.

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We are excited to be having our first ever party or parties as it is, celebrating the Month of African consciousness – or in Brazil- “Mês da Consciência Negra” or Black Month – Mês negro.

On November 20 this day is celebrated officially, and is alternatively called ‘Dia Nacional de Zumbi’- National Day of Zumbi.

#HISTORYTIP Zumbi (1655-1695) is a historic figure in Brazil, particularly for African-Brazilians. He gave his life in his fight and revolt against slavery. A real champ.

As you may know, besides Nigeria, Brazil is the second country with the most humans of African origin. Where better to also have our parties, right?

As we are immensely proud of our roots, we will be putting up four shows in November- each Saturday at Gamboa Nova Theatre, our principal partner for the project. Special thanks to our media support, TVE Bahia and Educadora FM.

To kick off this party entitled FESTA AFRIKAJUMP! Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili and her band AWETO will present shows in company of other invited artists, amazing musicians like Fabiana Rasta, Vivi Akwaba, Jôh Ras, Teekay Omoyele, Normando Mendes, Lalo Aleman, Bobo Tafari, Suyá Nascimento and more. We are so excited!!!

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All shows start at 19HS PROMPT. COME if you are in Salvador.

We shall keep you posted!

Also don’t forget to check out our facebook, there are gems there too fam.

https://www.facebook.com/AfrikajumpWorldwide/

Want to be part of the festivities? Get tickets-

NOV 3- http://bit.ly/2Q3wcBe

NOV 10- http://bit.ly/2Q3wcBe

PEACE!

Afrikajump celebrates with Nigeria’s first ever women Bob sled team which has qualified for the Winter Olympics. The trio of Seun Adigun (driver) and brakewomen Ngozi Onwumere and Akuoma Omeoga completed all five of their required qualifying races to become the first African team, men or women, to qualify for the sport in the 2018 games that takes place in PyeongChang, South Korea. Yeah!

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photo from Bellanaija

For those who don’t know, these women were responsible for chasing after this huge feat independently. It is not a secret that Nigeria’s sport federation is mostly focused on soccer- and we use the word ‘focused’ loosely because Nigeria’s football has been plagued with in house politics and corruption, which has been hugely detrimental to the sport in the country.

The women funded and pursued this dream while juggling higher studies in medicine until their exploits built them a following of supporters like Nigerian British actor John Boyega.

At some point in their quest, they fashioned sleds from wood, to train and practice in their Houston Texas base. It paid off.

Their feat also made more people (like us ) aware that there is a Bobsled and Skeleton Federation of Nigeria. We at Afrikajump can admit we had no idea. We became aware when the officials of the association suddenly started granting interviews commending the ladies. /side eye/.

We commend these outstanding women too and shall keep you posted on their future feats right here.

Congrats Africa!

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In this present day Africa where most things that are our trademark historically, economically, socially and culturally are getting eroded, it is refreshing to see people, especially young people that insist on being Africans- acknowledging the continents richness in spirituality, culture and other ways that pay homage to their rich roots.

Based in Eastern Nigeria, Precious Amarachi-Ugo a cultural enthusiast and explorer seeks to remind Africans of who we were, and what we can be. Her mission reads like the Ghanaian phrase SANKOFA which is a call for us to return to our roots. Amarachi-Ugo believes this is the path through which Africa and indeed Africans can be free again, in body, mind and spirit. We do too, and also love her love for mystery.

AFRIKAJUMP asked her questions about her life and great mission.
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AFRIKAJUMP-Thanks so much for giving some of your precious time, Precious. It is a real pleasure. Can you tell us when you realized your love for travel and exploring?

PRECIOUS-I realized the love for traveling at a very tender age. Mostly from my dad, I grew up with my dad; always traveling during the weekends, going to the borders of Benin and Nigeria to buy shoes that he sold in different places like the Ministry of works and sorts. They said I took after my dad in everything because as young as 10/11 years old, my parents were comfortable putting me in a bus whenever I’m going for a holiday and giving the driver a number to call when we alight. They knew I enjoyed it and I was smart enough to be safe.

AFRIKAJUMP-Yes we don’t need a soothsayer to make us see your bravery. Congrats. What does culture mean to you?

PRECIOUS-Culture is everything to me and also I will say I’m just an old soul. It became my own way of life, even when I barely knew what I was doing I’ve always been attracted to culture. I came from a poor staunch Christian home so anything with any cultural attributes was always frowned at and automatically labeled evil-one of the disadvantages we suffer from religion/colonization. To me however culture will always be that way of living; the way our ancestors lived, the way they flourished just with exactly what we have around us.

AFRIKAJUMP-Preach sister.  Tell us about your project Myafurika please.

PRECIOUS-Myafurika is a huge project that is going to affect almost every aspect of reawakening in Africa as a whole. Myafurika focuses on showcasing the beauty and wonders of Africa. We travel to those places in Africa with historical heritages, rich in traditions and nature. Places that hold histories of Africa that most Africans don’t know ever happened. We go there, get pictures, videos then write about them for the world to see that Africa is not about dark people living in the dark; to show the world that Africa is beyond beautiful and to assure and teach our people that we can be greater and dependent by ourselves. We will also be introducing fashion very soon that we will make possible with our hand woven materials of course made here from start to finish.

AFRIKAJUMP-Sounds great, Good luck. What are some of the biggest challenges you’ve encountered on your adventures?

PRECIOUS-Finance. It has been a very big issue because most people that would have been able to finance are dragging back because they don’t agree with our stance, saying it’s against their religion. Some don’t just see the importance of the reawakening because they are comfortable in not knowing and don’t want to know.
Then there is the issue of bad roads. We do most of our traveling by road and most of our roads are death traps thus making some trips fearful ones.

AFRIKAJUMP-Many Nigerians your age mostly practice religions that were imposed on Africans but you hold your ancestral beliefs close to your heart. What is the motivation?

PRECIOUS-Like I said before,I’m an old soul,its within me. Even with the fact of being born into  a staunch Christian home,religion never made sense to me. My grandmother played a big part in motivating me, around the short period I stayed with her,in the evenings when we sit in the veranda, and I ask her questions about religion she always ended up with a line I never forget. She will say to me ‘My dear daughter, always keep your heart clean and pure and always , have good intentions towards your fellow humans cause in anybody religion is within themselves’.

AFRIKAJUMP- Wise words. What do you propose to encourage religious tolerance in Nigeria, particularly those of our native belief systems?

PRECIOUS-Whenever the discussions on that tolerance is raised, I always use the saying “Live and let live” we live in a country that supports freedom of religion and that wasn’t categorized on some and some are left. So if some religion or Christians and/or Muslims are against native believers,what makes them different from what they preach about which is “Love”? So I think individuals should learn to understand that people’s way of worship doesn’t change anything from who they are, before any religion we were first of all  Humans. And no amount of religion is going change that.

AFRIKAJUMP- Preach. What is your dream destination?

PRECIOUS-South Africa,Greece

AFRIKAJUMP-Can you describe your city in one word?

PRECIOUS-Beautiful
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CHECK PRECIOUS’ WEBSITE HERE

http://myafurika.com/

FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/MyAfurika/

 

AFRIKAJUMP took a trip on February 17 to a spiritual place, Terreiro do Capivari. We found it magical too.

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This large expanse of land in Bahia Brazil is a testament to history, Africa and the inspiring resilience of Afro-Brazilians. Nature lives and thrives here as evidenced by its luscious vegetation.  Its natural ambiance is a huge part of  Terreiro do Capivari’s history. In Brazil a terreiro is where the Afro-Brazilian religion called Candomblé is practiced. This religion with roots from Nigeria and Benin Republic was spread in countries like Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, America and some other nations by Africans who were stolen through slavery.

The most striking visual here in Terreiro do Capivari has to be a proud Iroko tree dedicated to Obaluaiye-lord of the earth, and Osumare– the Rainbow god. The magnificent tree with delicious fruits dates over 200 years.

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Another remarkable thing is this tree lives right in the house with the inhabitants who made an altar of it. It has being a home of refuge and prayer for so many decades.

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In the story narrated by the gracious Babalorisa and Iyalorisa who received us warmly, the location was lived in by a Brazilian slave owner who as expected bought a stolen African; an ancestor of this present Babalorisa. As time went on, freedom came for the enslaved in Brazil, but Baba’s ancestor continued to live there while he weighed his options.

Then there came a major outbreak of cholera which killed many. Baba’s ancestral family was affected but they did not die because their father knew what herbs to get from the bush to tackle the disease. Eventually the disease spread to the slave owner’s family, the lady of the house panicked and asked Baba for help. Baba’s kindness and his plants saved them, and in gratitude she asked him to choose a large portion of the land for himself. He erected his altar and the rest is history.

There is a house of Baba Egun, altars of Ogun, Sango, and a sweet running stream, a sign of Osun.

There are many relics from many decades past like this box used to transport materials, drums fashioned directly from a tree, this grinding stone, which was stolen but recovered by Brazilian authorities in far away Sao Paulo! Sigh. Some people are just…No words.

Reverence to our good ancestors is a huge part of Africa’s belief systems, and in this terreiro, ancestors who set the path are fondly remembered.

Today the land is home to many medicinal plants- some rare, trees and unending music from birds.

AFRIKAJUMP is grateful to Babalorisa and Iyalorisa who welcomed us with open arms and minds.

There are plans for an exposition here in the near future. To know more, here’s their facebook

https://www.facebook.com/Terreiro-do-Capivari-Casa-de-Obaluay%C3%AA-e-Oxumar%C3%AA-285103178325540/

Ase.

Vodun or Voodoo festival celebrated every January in Ouidah Benin is a testament of Beninese’ resilience and commitment to their ancestral spirituality. The practice which is often misunderstood and painted in bad light was once banned by the West African nation’s imperialist oppressors until 1994. In 1996 it was declared one of Benin’s national religions; seeing as sixty percent of the country’s population continue to practice it, sometimes alongside Islam and Christianity.

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The ancient belief is practiced by over 60 million people worldwide.

In the festival devotees give offerings to ancestral spirits, ask for peace and blessings with rituals led by the Vodun Chief priest in Ouidah. They also pray at the sea for the souls of those who were forced into slavery some hundreds of years ago. Ouidah, like Nigeria’s Badagry was a major port of transportation of millions of people who were stolen from Africa’s Western region. These Africans are responsible for the export of the spiritual practice in some other parts of the world like Haiti, Cuba, America, Brazil and the United States.

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Leke Alabi-Isama a documentary photographer from Nigeria attended this year’s edition of the vibrant and energetic festival, and was gracious enough to share some of his shots from the event.

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To see more from the artist, check out his website below, and also subscribe to our blog.

http://www.alabiisama.com/

 

 

Reggae’s most prominent exponent Bob Marley says in one of his songs “If you know your history, then you will know where you are coming from”. While it is favorable to some despicable elements for some histories to be erased or distorted to promote lies/lines that entrap many and enrich them and a select few, there are many people who refuse to be oblivious to their past, however unfortunate it may have been. Some of these people are Brazilians in South America who share African heritage, the Afro Brazilians.

In this second nation on earth with the largest concentration of Africans besides Nigeria, Afro Brazilians in states like Bahia, Recife, Rio De Janeiro, and Goiania insist on practicing their ancestral spiritual beliefs, especially through Candomble, which adores African gods. The religion is mostly patterned in Nigeria’s Yoruba traditional belief systems.

Every February in Salvador, Bahia devotees of Yemoja- goddess of the sea gather to sing, dance, offer sacrifices laced with perfume, talc, flowers and jewelry in hopes of

blessings from this maternal energy.

After the early morning rituals, there are musical concerts and street exhibitions and it is a beautiful sight that we are looking forward to in a few weeks, like we did in 2016.