Archives for posts with tag: Women

The weekend of 15 and 16 November was a memorable one for music lovers in Salvador Brazil. Fans were thrilled with Brazilian and world music and also important is the bands and projects were women-led. And we were there for it, love.

The event which happened at Commons Music Bar started with the incredible Héloa from Sergipe, Brazil. Launching her second new album ‘Opará’ which celebrates the ‘meeting of waters’ and her ancestrality.

After her delicious set which left all wanting more, Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili and her band Aweto came on and gave an incredible performance which won them more fans. The fantastic DJ Belle then gave us something to hit the road with. Known in Brazil as a ‘Saidera’. Check out Okwei!

The next day 16 was the day for African-American duo ‘Oshun‘. The hall which was packed full of happy and excited people sang and danced along with the inspirational and exceptional artists. Take a look.

It is a thing of beauty when people- women- especially African and of African origins taking the spotlight to inspire and show what they can. THANK YOU QUEENS.

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As rainhas dirigem tudo na Intercenas Musicais, Salvador.

O fim de semana de 15 e 16 de novembro foi memorável para os amantes da música em Salvador, Brasil. Os fãs ficaram emocionados com a música brasileira e mundial, e também importante por que foi pelas mulheres.

O evento que aconteceu no Commons Music Bar começou com o incrível Heloa de Sergipe que lançou seu novo álbum ‘Opará’, na Bahia. O disco comemora ‘o encontro das águas’ e sua ancestralidade.

Depois de seu set maravilhoso que deixou todos querendo mais, a cantora e compositora nigeriana Okwei Odili e sua banda Aweto apresentou uma performance incrível que conquistou mais fãs. A fantástica DJ Belle forneceu a saidera.

No dia seguinte, 16 foi o dia da dupla afro-americana ‘Oshun’. O salão que estava cheio de gente cantava e dançava junto com artistas inspiradores e excepcionais.

É uma coisa de beleza quando pessoas – mulheres – especialmente africanas e de origem africana, ficar em frente, nos palcos, para inspirar e mostrar o que podem. OBRIGADO RAINHAS.

Tomorrow Friday 15/11 is Intercenas Musicais Festival at Commons Studio Bar in Salvador, Brazil.

The festival which boasts of a long line of some of Brazil and the world’s talented musical artists opens its doors yet again at 8PM to fans and artists like beautiful singer/songwriter Héloa from Sergipe, Brazil who came into the limelight with her first EP entitled Soltar. She will also launch her new album entitled Opará.

After her show, amazing Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili takes the stage in company of her band AWETO. Okwei who lives between West Africa and Brazil,  gained visibility in the enchanting South American nation when she and some local Brazilian musicians from Salvador formed a band IFA in her first visit to Brazil, which led to a joint album in 2015. Now the enchanting and inspirational artist with her band will present some of her works in true Afrobeat and Soul fashion. The show will end with a DJ set by Dj Belle.

On Saturday, the party continues with Afrofuturistic American group Oshun. The women will bring their bliss vibes, heavy beats and conscious lyrics which have earned them a growing cult following from 8pm, with locally acclaimed and respected Dj Dudoo Caribe ending the show.

For more info about the festival, check Commons Studio Bar

The 33rd Bienal of São Paulo, Brazil officially opened to the public on September 7th, 2018 and AFRIKAJUMP was right in the thick of Ibirapuera Park- home to the massive Bienal building, for all the action- okay, most of it.

Ibirapuera park is famed for being the most visited park in South America.

ibi41214ephoto credit- trekearth.com

TIPS- #Surely bring your cameras to capture the greenery, art and of course, birds.

#Wear running shoes.

#Try the restaurants in the park.

For an entire week Afrikajump had a blast in Sampa (nickname for SP) getting up-close and sometimes personal with artists and their work, and once we did party. Responsibly.

According to its organizers, the 32nd edition of the global event which exhibits some of the most interesting artworks from around the world- over 600 of them this year, traveled to 13 venues (2 of them abroad), reaching at least 650,000 people.

This year, the foundation hand-selected Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro to curate, and then seven other artists were invited to do likewise, namely Mamma Andersson, Antonio Ballester Moreno, Sofia Borges, Waltercio Caldas, Alejandro Cesarco, Claudia Fontes, and Wura-Natasha Ogunji.

Ogunji, a visual artist of Nigerian and American heritage and her group of selected artists and collaborators brought rays of light, diversity and womanity to the event. Her curated work entitled Sempre, nunca [Always, never], involves selected artists like Lhola Amira- South Africa,  Mame-Diarra Niang- Ivory Coast/Senegal,  Nicole Vlado- US/Puerto Rico, Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze- Nigeria, and Youmna Chlala- Lebanon/US.

According to Wura,“Their creative investigations range from the intimate (body, memory, gesture) to the epic (history, country, cosmos),”

She added that the six artists are presenting new artworks that explore space and place in relation to the body, to history and to architecture, and that their work was developed in a dialogue among artists, their individual projects and practices inter-cross ideas and questions about courage, freedom and experimentation, key aspects of the artistic process.

WhatsApp Image 2018-09-21 at 00.37.33‘The sea and it’s raining. I missed you so much’ 2018. By Wura Ogunji on display at the Bienal.
WhatsApp Image 2018-09-21 at 00.36.19WhatsApp Image 2018-09-21 at 00.36.17Nicole Vlado’s ‘Here’ (I gaze at stars to heal wounds) 2018. On display at the Bienal.

Wura besides expressing through drawings, videos and public performances often explores the presence of women in public spaces in collaboration with other women, and this was seen also on Sunday September 9th , where dozens of Brazilian and African women donned black attires and eventually transformed into gorgeous dresses made of richly colored African prints in a performance ‘Dias de ser livre’ or in English, ‘Days of being free’. It was presented by 20 women and with the participation of the public.

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We appreciated most of the art and expressions at the event, and are happy to say our top pick for 2018’s Bienal is undoubtedly Wura Ogunji with her African queens.

Their works network and connect to create a melting point of healing, reflection, serenity and strong hope. Days of being free was a hit, drawing in the public to that all familiar situation of struggles which give way to victories, ease and peace.

And to further cream our desserts, check out the women’s musical compilation playlist for their project. It made us fiercer fans.

Listen here

http://www.33.bienal.org.br/pt/playlist-detalhe/5303

Artworks can now be seen at the Bienal building in Ibirapuera park until early December, consult  with Bienal site to know more.

http://33.bienal.org.br/en/

Photos from Days of being free. Credits/ Fabiola Antunes, Wura Ogunji, Ana Lu Sanches.

Rant of the week is a new segment of AFRIKAJUMP where we basically bring you constructive rants by mostly Africans on Africa and the rest of the World as concerns the ranters. Phew.

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This segment will be unending, we predict.

Today’s rant is amply supplied by Maburuzo, a Nigerian in disapora. Enjoy…?

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“One of the pleasant surprises I had when I first came to Brazil was meeting a woman president, seeing a woman poet on their money and finding out all their passports and documents first had your mother’s family name before finally your fathers.
I immediately knew nobody will call me ASHAWO! No matter what I wear here.

As someone from a region in Africa that has sworn to uphold and carry patriarchy on it’s head perpetually I was impressed.

Recently me and some friends were talking and they couldn’t believe in Nigeria, mothers’ family name didn’t appear on any of our sh/t. When you think about it, it really is incredulous, because there are many cases when the man doesn’t know if he is the father of the child, but WITHOUT ANY DOUBT, the mother is the mother.

So I am not shocked when our senior Naija men cannot pass ordinary gender equality bill. It seems they have 200 more years to go in their imbecility and lack of vision, and we the Nigerian people ALWAYS help them.”

#Culture #Politics #Societaldifferences #Nigeria #Brazil #Women #Gender#Equality #WomenRights

The venue was the historical Pelourinho in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil on Sunday 12th of August. It was the close of a book festival and the afternoon till late evening was alive with music, color and culture, right in front of the Jorge Amado foundation.

The event featured Salvador’s Afrosymphonic Orchestra, Mario Uolla, Gabriel Batatinha, Doudou Rose from Senegal, Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili, Monica Millet, Bira Reis, and many more cool cats.

In this clip, legendary Baiana Percussionist Monica Millet and her all female group- Mestras do Saberes play Samba Reggae in the company of Baiano Percussionist- Anderson Souza, /RIGHT/ whose father was one of the founders of OLODUM, the group which in addition to many feats choreographed Michael Jackson’s ‘They don’t really care about us’, another legend- Bira Reis plays the Sax, and Nigerian singer and composer Okwei Odili sings in Yoruba.

Enjoy, and PEACEEEE.

In this present day Africa where most things that are our trademark historically, economically, socially and culturally are getting eroded, it is refreshing to see people, especially young people that insist on being Africans- acknowledging the continents richness in spirituality, culture and other ways that pay homage to their rich roots.

Based in Eastern Nigeria, Precious Amarachi-Ugo a cultural enthusiast and explorer seeks to remind Africans of who we were, and what we can be. Her mission reads like the Ghanaian phrase SANKOFA which is a call for us to return to our roots. Amarachi-Ugo believes this is the path through which Africa and indeed Africans can be free again, in body, mind and spirit. We do too, and also love her love for mystery.

AFRIKAJUMP asked her questions about her life and great mission.
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AFRIKAJUMP-Thanks so much for giving some of your precious time, Precious. It is a real pleasure. Can you tell us when you realized your love for travel and exploring?

PRECIOUS-I realized the love for traveling at a very tender age. Mostly from my dad, I grew up with my dad; always traveling during the weekends, going to the borders of Benin and Nigeria to buy shoes that he sold in different places like the Ministry of works and sorts. They said I took after my dad in everything because as young as 10/11 years old, my parents were comfortable putting me in a bus whenever I’m going for a holiday and giving the driver a number to call when we alight. They knew I enjoyed it and I was smart enough to be safe.

AFRIKAJUMP-Yes we don’t need a soothsayer to make us see your bravery. Congrats. What does culture mean to you?

PRECIOUS-Culture is everything to me and also I will say I’m just an old soul. It became my own way of life, even when I barely knew what I was doing I’ve always been attracted to culture. I came from a poor staunch Christian home so anything with any cultural attributes was always frowned at and automatically labeled evil-one of the disadvantages we suffer from religion/colonization. To me however culture will always be that way of living; the way our ancestors lived, the way they flourished just with exactly what we have around us.

AFRIKAJUMP-Preach sister.  Tell us about your project Myafurika please.

PRECIOUS-Myafurika is a huge project that is going to affect almost every aspect of reawakening in Africa as a whole. Myafurika focuses on showcasing the beauty and wonders of Africa. We travel to those places in Africa with historical heritages, rich in traditions and nature. Places that hold histories of Africa that most Africans don’t know ever happened. We go there, get pictures, videos then write about them for the world to see that Africa is not about dark people living in the dark; to show the world that Africa is beyond beautiful and to assure and teach our people that we can be greater and dependent by ourselves. We will also be introducing fashion very soon that we will make possible with our hand woven materials of course made here from start to finish.

AFRIKAJUMP-Sounds great, Good luck. What are some of the biggest challenges you’ve encountered on your adventures?

PRECIOUS-Finance. It has been a very big issue because most people that would have been able to finance are dragging back because they don’t agree with our stance, saying it’s against their religion. Some don’t just see the importance of the reawakening because they are comfortable in not knowing and don’t want to know.
Then there is the issue of bad roads. We do most of our traveling by road and most of our roads are death traps thus making some trips fearful ones.

AFRIKAJUMP-Many Nigerians your age mostly practice religions that were imposed on Africans but you hold your ancestral beliefs close to your heart. What is the motivation?

PRECIOUS-Like I said before,I’m an old soul,its within me. Even with the fact of being born into  a staunch Christian home,religion never made sense to me. My grandmother played a big part in motivating me, around the short period I stayed with her,in the evenings when we sit in the veranda, and I ask her questions about religion she always ended up with a line I never forget. She will say to me ‘My dear daughter, always keep your heart clean and pure and always , have good intentions towards your fellow humans cause in anybody religion is within themselves’.

AFRIKAJUMP- Wise words. What do you propose to encourage religious tolerance in Nigeria, particularly those of our native belief systems?

PRECIOUS-Whenever the discussions on that tolerance is raised, I always use the saying “Live and let live” we live in a country that supports freedom of religion and that wasn’t categorized on some and some are left. So if some religion or Christians and/or Muslims are against native believers,what makes them different from what they preach about which is “Love”? So I think individuals should learn to understand that people’s way of worship doesn’t change anything from who they are, before any religion we were first of all  Humans. And no amount of religion is going change that.

AFRIKAJUMP- Preach. What is your dream destination?

PRECIOUS-South Africa,Greece

AFRIKAJUMP-Can you describe your city in one word?

PRECIOUS-Beautiful
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CHECK PRECIOUS’ WEBSITE HERE

http://myafurika.com/

FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/MyAfurika/

 

On this year’s World Read Aloud Day, it is a real pleasure to have Nigerian Author, Editor and children’s book writer Ayo Olofintuade as our guest. Ayo became more visible on Nigeria’s literary scene after her book ENO’S STORY published in 2010 earned her a Nigeria Prize for Literature nomination.

She is more interesting because she isn’t only about writing books, but wants people; particularly Nigerians; to read books. To actualize this challenge she founded LAIPO Mobile Library which has engaged hundreds of Nigerian children in reading and other literary activities.

We are also inspired by her human rights activism.

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We caught up with Ayo at her Ibadan base and had a good chat, after which she graciously read a passage from her heartwarming new work KING OF THE HEAP, in celebration of 2017’s World Read Aloud Day. Enjoy.

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AFRIKAJUMP- Thanks for sharing your time with us Ayo. You were our top choice on the blog today also because of your spirited efforts in the area of literacy with Nigerian children. Why are you so involved?

AYO- I grew up reading, so when I discovered that a lot of children do not have access to libraries or good books I decided to do something about it.

AFRIKAJUMP- Congrats. We are excited about your new book “King of the heap”. What inspired it?

AYO- One of the things I discovered while running the mobile library project in public and lower income private schools is that the children enjoy books with characters they are familiar with. King of the heap was written for the children I teach. They are the children you see on the streets after school hours, during holidays and on weekends, selling things by the roadside. These are my heroes because they’re determined to make a life for themselves in spite of all the odds stacked against them.

AFRIKAJUMP- We hear the book isn’t going to be widely distributed, but will feature in some select libraries- some consolation. Why is this so?

AYO- I applied for a business grant from the Tony Elumelu Foundation, I had such grand plans but things didn’t work out the way I’d envisaged them, because of the economy and sheer incompetence of the people I worked with. Instead of completely losing out I made the decision to keep the circulation low while I work on other business models that can work in the situationship called Nigeria.

AFRIKAJUMP- Why have you chosen to write for children?

AYO- I am that eternal child that still watches cartoons and reads comics.

AFRIKAJUMP- What was your favorite book as a child?

AYO- My Father’s Daughter by Mabel Segun, basically because it features a black, female character who went on the same adventure as boys.

AFRIKAJUMP- Who’s your favourite Author now? You only get to choose one… hehehe evil, I know.

AYO- You are Evil. But I’m presently enamoured with Yaa Gyasi. Her book ‘Homegoing’ provided a much needed insight into the slavery period in Africa, particularly what happened in the Gold Coast.

AFRIKAJUMP- On this year’s World Read Aloud day, how do you think the reading culture of your country can be improved?

AYO- The only way is the provision of quality education that makes reading (and I’m not talking about textbooks here) its chief concern.

AFRIKAJUMP- Can you describe your city in one word?

AYO- Sarcastic.